Nobody wants Silence of the Lambs house

Price of Fayette County home from ‘Silence of the Lambs’ keeps falling

This home near Perryopolis which appeared in “The Silence of the Lambs” is up for sale. In the film, the three-story Victorian was the home of a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill.

(This home near Perryopolis, PA, which appeared in “The Silence of the Lambs” is up for sale. In the film, the three-story Victorian was the home of a serial killer nicknamed Buffalo Bill.  PHOTO BY TRIBUNE-REVIEW)

 

Potential buyers have been silent so far when it comes to offers for the Fayette County house featured as the villain’s torture den in the thriller “The Silence of the Lambs.”  But spring is nearly here, and Dianne Wilks hopes that brings a real offer.  “It’s going to sell,” said the real estate agent with RE/MAX Select Realty. “It’s a lovely home.”

Owners Scott and Barbara Lloyd this month further reduced their asking price, which now is $224,900. They’ve reduced it four times since it hit the market in August at $300,000.

“That was the pie-in-the-sky price,” Wilks said. “We were hoping some movie person would come in and buy it.”  An open house is scheduled April 3. Wilks said she has shown the house a number of times recently and has private showings scheduled for potential buyers from Virginia and Indiana.  “I know they are going to like it,” she said.

Several previous offers fell through for various reasons, Wilks said. All were from local residents.  “I feel that more than likely that will be the buyer — someone nearby,” she said. “You don’t just move from New York City to Layton.”

The small hamlet sits across the Youghiogheny River from Perryopolis, about an hour south of Pittsburgh.  The three-story Victorian on Circle Street was featured in the 1991 murder thriller — and multiple Oscar winner, including Best Picture — as the home of serial killer Jame “Buffalo Bill” Gumb. There’s no prisoner holding pit in the basement, as the movie’s house had.  The house was the second-most viewed property in 2015 on realtor.com, trailing only a 28,000-square-foot Beverly Hills mansion originally listed at $195 million. The owner pulled it off the market after a $46 million price reduction failed to attract a buyer.  Wilks said she is confident the Lloyds’ home will sell this year.  “It’s like we’re close but no cigar,” she said.

The house has four bedrooms and a finished attic, but limited indoor plumbing served by a well and only one bathroom.

“That has been a problem,” Wilks said.

Part of the price reduction was to account for money needed to add a second bath or powder room, Wilks said. One could be added under the main staircase or by sacrificing the back staircase, or part of the butler’s pantry or dining room, she said.  It also has central air, a modern kitchen and a gas-log fireplace in the “winter parlor.” A vintage Chessie System train caboose stands next to an in-ground pool.  The house was built in 1910. The Lloyds bought it in 1976.  “They’ve done a great job taking care of it,” Wilks said. “The house itself is immaculate, beautiful.”

Jason Cato is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-320-7936 orjcato@tribweb.com.

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